President's Award Winner

Council of Juvenile Justice Administrators Steve Lafreniere, left, who is also the executive director of the Alabama Department of Youth Services, stands with Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice Commissioner Tyrone Oliver and Mike Dempsey, the CJJA executive director, as Oliver is named the CJJA President’s Award winner for 2021.

BRAINTREE, Mass. — Tyrone Oliver, who is the commissioner of the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice, was announced Aug. 14 as the recipient of the Council of Juvenile Justice Administrators’ 2021 President’s Award.

Gov. Brian Kemp issued a statement about Oliver and his job performance since he tapped the Newton County native as commissioner in July 2019.

“Commissioner Oliver has proven himself to be a strong leader in our state’s service to youth in the criminal justice system,” Kemp said. “He has rightfully earned the CJJA President’s Award because of his genuine commitment to bettering the lives of countless youth and fostering safe communities across our state.

“The Kemp family and the state of Georgia are thankful to Commissioner Oliver, and we congratulate him on this great achievement.”

Oliver, who is the former chief of the Social Circle Police Department, is responsible for the daily operation of the state agency that includes more than 3,500 employees. Its mission is “to transform young lives by providing evidence-based rehabilitative treatment services and supervision, strengthening youth and families' well-being, and fostering safe communities.”

The department serves the state’s justice-involved youth up to 21 years of age.

“It was my pleasure to award Commissioner Tyrone Oliver the President’s Award for 2021,” said Steve Lafreniere, president of CJJA and executive director of the Alabama Department of Youth Services. “If you have spent any time with him, then you know he is genuine and authentic. He took over during a challenging transition in his department and while learning his state system, he also stepped up when asked to assume additional responsibilities within CJJA.”

The CJJA President’s Award was created in 2013 to recognize a member who has made a significant contribution through participation in the organization’s activities, according to the state DJJ. Awardees reflect a dedication to improving the youth’s outcomes in their care and display an approach to leadership that values their staff and empowers them to be agents of change.

“I am honored to receive this award from the Council of Juvenile Justice Administrators,” Oliver said. “I am truly grateful for the opportunity to serve the juvenile justice system as a member of this organization.”

Oliver is a 20-year veteran of law enforcement who began his career in 1999 as a detention officer with the Newton County Sheriff’s Office. Oliver was one of the first employees of the Brookhaven Police Department when the new city was formed in 2013. Oliver was named Social Circle’s chief of police in January 2016.

In November 2018, he was appointed Social Circle’s deputy city manager and served in both roles until Kemp tapped him for the statewide appointment.

Oliver is a graduate of Columbus State University’s Law Enforcement Professional Management Program. He also completed the FBI's Law Enforcement Executive Development Program, FBI Leadership Trilogy, and attended the Georgia International Law Enforcement Exchange to Israel.

While in Social Circle, Oliver served on the board of Communities In Schools of Walton County, later the Student Success Alliance.

He and his wife, Aimee, have five children and one granddaughter.

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